Published On: Fri, Feb 16th, 2018

Need a post on Harvard.edu about your ICO? $500, please

In a unconstrained hunt to benefit credit for token products, founders are resorting to some untrustworthy – and absurd – tactics. After researching a uncanny universe of pay-for-play recently and holding partial in this display on a space, we stumbled on another dilemma of a Internet that is a bit disturbing. It seems a robe of perplexing to cheat writers for large sites and providing entrance to those sites to marketers is still alive and well.

Every few days we get a ask to post something on TechCrunch. Let me make this clear: we can't buy a post here. You simply cannot. There are some sponsored advertorial things on here though we can't squeeze a genuine post from any writer. Anyone who is offered we one is fibbing and if someone is perplexing to sell we one greatfully email me (john@techcrunch.com).

The easiest approach to get coverage is to favour a attribute with a author and make a cold product or service. That’s it. That’s a sorcery formula.

Usually I’m on a receiving finish of these pitches to post junk content. Today, however we viewed a note on Facebook charity me a guest post on Harvard’s website. That’s right: Harvard.edu. Confused, we asked for an example. we got what we see above. we won’t post a URL here though we will put it on my Twitter if someone asks. we don’t wish to ventilate such blatant junk.

Having a post on a prestigious website is a goldmine for scammers. Investors, who are mostly too bustling to do most due diligence, demeanour for a few critical markers before signing checks. Does a association have a good team? Does a association have what appears to be a product? Do they have press mentions? In this sold box we can suppose a sequence of events: a scammer approaches investors with a token sale or some other product. They ask for bonafides. The scammer produces a poorly-written post on Harvard.edu by someone we assume is from Harvard. Bingo. Instant credibility.

Further, a couple on a highly-regarded website is mostly viewed as an SEO boost for marketers. And we can’t get some-more prestigious than Harvard.edu.

What’s going on here? The scammer we spoke to is posting to blogs.harvard.edu, a giveaway use combined in 2011 by a Harvard highbrow that lets anyone emanate a WordPress blog. From a page:

The blogs.harvard.edu WordPress height is a giveaway use for a Harvard community. Anyone with an email residence during harvard.edu, radcliffe.edu, or hbs.edu can pointer up.

It’s formidable to find an director for a site though it’s transparent that a poster, hassam540, has one of those email addresses. The Facebook user who approached me, HassAm, claims to be CEO during Cheap Seo deals. He pronounced that he can sell me a Harvard.edu email residence for “10 bitcoin,” that sounds a bit high. we could substantially enroll during Harvard for that much.

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